Public Housing Waitlist

WaitlistTypeStatus
Housing Authority of the City of CheyennePublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Rock Springs Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Casper Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Casper Housing AuthorityProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of the Town of DouglasPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Hanna Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Evanston Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice

What is Public Housing?

Similar to section 8, Public Housing is another form of rental assistance through the government. These programs are put into place to help people who are considered low-income for the area. They also put a lot of lower-income students into better schools so they have access to more opportunities. 

The public housing program is also provided to seniors and people with disabilities. These groups of people made up 56% of public housing recipients in 2020. This program is funded by the Public Housing Capital Fund and the Public Housing Operation Fund which struggle to get funding to meet demand. As always funding is difficult to acquire for these programs and although they get some funding, a lot of these units are in need of renovations and no additional funding has been allocated for building/ buying new units since 1990. 

Who does public housing help?

Public housing helps so many people across the country. The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities conducted an analysis on the people who benefit from the public housing program. In 2018 they went through data from the department of housing of urban development and the result are presented below. 

It looks like public housing is used mostly by families of different ethnicities. Looking at this data, it’s nice to see that these programs are actually supporting the your with 37% of people living in a public housing household are under 18. Public housing gives people access to education and job opportunities outside of their current demographic and makes financial mobility more accessible. 

How do I apply for Public Housing? 

Similar to section 8, there are thousands of Housing Adminstration offices that work to manage these programs. These offices areas in large cities, full cities, or multiple jurisdictions in the area. The application has to be in written format and there’s no online process. Either you or your local HUD office will fill it out prior to filing. 

There’s certian things you’re HUD agent will need in order to assist in completing your application. This includes information about all adults and children residing in the unit, your current contact information, your living cericumstances and veteran status, previous landlords for references, information and proof of income, and information on how they can verify the income level. An inspector can also come to your current residence to see the current state of your home and conduct some interviews in the household. More advanced public housing authority offices have self serve kiosks where you can apply. Aside from that, they can accept applications via email, telephone, and mail. Here are some things you should expect on your applications: 

  • Name and social security number of head of household
  • Date and time of application or application number
  • Household Type
  • Number of family members
  • Amount and source of annual income
  • Admission preference, if any
  • Accessibility requirement, if any
  • Race and ethnicity of the family head

Who qualifies for Public Housing?

There are three main qualification factors to know if you qualify for section 8 housing. These include your income level compared to your area, your disability, elderly or familial status, and you citizenship/immigration status. As you know, income limits change from city to city so you may be eligible in one jurisdiction but not eligible in another. 

There are also some disqualifying factors to consider before applying for public housing. Drug related crimes is one of the quickest ways to get disqualified from housing assistance. However, if you do have a criminal record, I would reach out to your local housing authority office to see their policy. It is possible to win an appeal based on rehabilitation and mitigation. 

How many Public Housing waitlists are open in Wyoming?

There are 7 public housing waitlists open in the state of Wyoming. On this page you’ll see all the current open waitlists and when they were updated. To apply to a waitlist, you’ll have to reach out to your local housing authority office. You can view our income limits tool to see your income limit for different counties. 

Similar to section 8, each jurisdiction establishes and administers its own program while maintaining federal guidelines. If you’d like to apply for multiple jurisdictions, you should contact each local office. 

Can I apply to a waitlist for a different county?

The public housing authority will only accept applications for open waitlists. However, you can apply for any jurisdiction you’d like and your local agent will narrow it down to the units you’re qualified for. It’s against the law for Public Housing Authorities to set minimum resident limits for housing assistance. 

Managing paperwork for so many different applications could get confusing and messy. It’s important that you keep track of all your communications and paperwork. If someone from the PHA repeatedly tries to reach out and has trouble getting in touch with you, you will be removed from the list.

Are my chances better if I apply as soon as it opens?

The Public Housing Authority does allocate preferences for people in certain situations. These preferences come in two forms, the location of the unit and the rankings to get placed in a unit. Before they can set these preferences in place, they need to first figure out which households match which units so they can start the smaller lists.

 It’s not one giant list or a lottery system. Since the lists are smaller, someone with fewer preferences may still get a unit before a priority household because it might not be a fit for other families. Here are some preferences to consider: 

  • Extremely low income (less than 40% of families in the local area)
  • Need to remain in a certain jurisdiction for work or school 
  • Elderly, Displaced or disabled 
  • Victims of Domestic Violence
  • Natural Disaster displacement 

What happens after I get approved?

Someone from your local PHA will reach out to you and let you know there’s a unit available for you. Since there can be multiple units available per waitlist, your agent will discuss the different sizes available to you. If you choose a smaller unit, you cannot request an adjustment unless there’s a change to the number of members in your family. If you choose the larger unit and your family size goes does, you will be moved into smaller units. However, PHA can’t deny a transfer for overcrowded households because this can provide a health and safety risk. 

Once you’re approved and have a unit, you’ll need to sign the lease. There’s additional paperwork since there’s now a third party involved. Over time you can expect people to come and do check-ins on your unit to make sure everything is up to the HUD’s standards.

WaitlistTypeStatus
New London Housing AuthoritySenior and Disabled Public Housing Waiting ListOpen Now
Various Bedroom SizesPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of the City of MilwaukeeSenior and Disabled Project-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
VeteranProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
FamilyProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of the City of MilwaukeeSenior and Disabled Public Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
FamilyPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
FamilyPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Community Development Authority of the City of MadisonSenior and Disabled Public Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Menomonie Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Hi-RisePublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
FamilyPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Marshfield Community Development AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Stanley Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Spooner Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Merrill Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Plymouth Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Amery Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of the City of New RichmondPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Brillion Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of the City of BarronPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Manitowoc Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
City of Edgerton Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Abbotsford Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Monroe Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Bruce Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Reedsville Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Scattered SitesPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Greenwood Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Algoma Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Fond du Lac Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Hurley Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Lake Mills Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Kaukauna Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Oconto Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Shawano City Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Richland Center Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Sheboygan Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Marinette Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Rice Lake Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of CumberlandPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Luck Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Sparta Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Woodville Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
River Falls Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Beloit Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Appleton Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Prairie du Chien Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Huntington House Apartments RADProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Parkview Apartments, Huntington House Apartments, 10th Avenue Apartments
and Scattered Site
Public Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Rhinelander Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Clintonville Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Osceola Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Green Bay Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Watertown Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
West Bend Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Antigo Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Jefferson Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Baraboo Community Development AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Tomah Public Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Park Falls Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Depere Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Ladysmith Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Westby Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Viroqua Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
City of Washburn and County of Bayfield Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Ashland Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Scattered SitesPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Berkshire Kensington Near ElderlySenior Project-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Breezewood VillageSenior Project-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Gander Apartments Homeless and DisabledProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Boscobel Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of Trempealeau CountyPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Eau Claire County Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Sauk County Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Eau Claire Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Lincoln County Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Ashland County Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Burnett County Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Fond Du Lac County Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Chilton Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
La Crosse County Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
1-BedroomPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Truax Park ApartmentsProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
South Milwaukee Community Development AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
South Milwaukee Community Development AuthoritySenior and Disabled Public Housing Waiting ListClosed
Mondovi Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Waite Rug Place 1 and 2-Bedroom Project-Based Voucher andPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Dane County Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Dane County Housing AuthorityProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
Stevens Point Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListUnknown

What is Public Housing?

Similar to section 8, Public Housing is another form of rental assistance through the government. These programs are put into place to help people who are considered low-income for the area. They also put a lot of lower-income students into better schools so they have access to more opportunities. 

The public housing program is also provided to seniors and people with disabilities. These groups of people made up 56% of public housing recipients in 2020. This program is funded by the Public Housing Capital Fund and the Public Housing Operation Fund which struggle to get funding to meet demand. As always funding is difficult to acquire for these programs and although they get some funding, a lot of these units are in need of renovations and no additional funding has been allocated for building/ buying new units since 1990. 

Who does public housing help?

Public housing helps so many people across the country. The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities conducted an analysis on the people who benefit from the public housing program. In 2018 they went through data from the department of housing of urban development and the result are presented below. 

It looks like public housing is used mostly by families of different ethnicities. Looking at this data, it’s nice to see that these programs are actually supporting the youth with 37% of people living in a public housing household are under 18. Public housing gives people access to education and job opportunities outside of their current demographic and makes financial mobility more accessible. 

How do I apply for Public Housing? 

Similar to section 8, there are thousands of Housing Administration offices that work to manage these programs. These offices areas in large cities, full cities, or multiple jurisdictions in the area. The application has to be in written format and there’s no online process. Either you or your local HUD office will fill it out prior to filing. 

There are certain things you’re HUD agent will need in order to assist in completing your application. This includes information about all adults and children residing in the unit, your current contact information, your living circumstances and veteran status, previous landlords for references, information and proof of income, and information on how they can verify the income level. An inspector can also come to your current residence to see the current state of your home and conduct some interviews in the household. More advanced public housing authority offices have self-serve kiosks where you can apply. Aside from that, they can accept applications via email, telephone, and mail. Here are some things you should expect from your applications: 

  • Name and social security number of head of household
  • Date and time of application or application number
  • Household Type
  • Number of family members
  • Amount and source of annual income
  • Admission preference, if any
  • Accessibility requirement, if any
  • Race and ethnicity of the family head

Who qualifies for Public Housing?

There are three main qualification factors to know if you qualify for section 8 housing. These include your income level compared to your area, your disability, elderly or familial status, and your citizenship/immigration status. As you know, income limits change from city to city so you may be eligible in one jurisdiction but not eligible in another. 

There are also some disqualifying factors to consider before applying for public housing. Drug-related crimes are one of the quickest ways to get disqualified from housing assistance. However, if you do have a criminal record, I would reach out to your local housing authority office to see their policy. It is possible to win an appeal based on rehabilitation and mitigation. 

How many Public Housing waitlists are open in Wisconsin?

There are 91 public housing waitlists open in the state of Wisconsin. On this page you’ll see all the current open waitlists and when they were updated. To apply to a waitlist, you’ll have to reach out to your local housing authority office. You can view our income limits tool to see your income limit for different counties. 

Similar to section 8, each jurisdiction establishes and administers its own program while maintaining federal guidelines. If you’d like to apply for multiple jurisdictions, you should contact each local office. 

Can I apply to a waitlist for a different county?

The public housing authority will only accept applications for open waitlists. However, you can apply for any jurisdiction you’d like and your local agent will narrow it down to the units you’re qualified for. It’s against the law for Public Housing Authorities to set minimum resident limits for housing assistance. 

Managing paperwork for so many different applications could get confusing and messy. It’s important that you keep track of all your communications and paperwork. If someone from the PHA repeatedly tries to reach out and has trouble getting in touch with you, you will be removed from the list.

Are my chances better if I apply as soon as it opens?

The Public Housing Authority does allocate preferences for people in certain situations. These preferences come in two forms, the location of the unit and the rankings to get placed in a unit. Before they can set these preferences in place, they need to first figure out which households match which units so they can start the smaller lists.

 It’s not one giant list or a lottery system. Since the lists are smaller, someone with fewer preferences may still get a unit before a priority household because it might not be a fit for other families. Here are some preferences to consider: 

  • Extremely low income (less than 40% of families in the local area)
  • Need to remain in a certain jurisdiction for work or school 
  • Elderly, Displaced or disabled 
  • Victims of Domestic Violence
  • Natural Disaster displacement 

What happens after I get approved?

Someone from your local PHA will reach out to you and let you know there’s a unit available for you. Since there can be multiple units available per waitlist, your agent will discuss the different sizes available to you. If you choose a smaller unit, you cannot request an adjustment unless there’s a change to the number of members in your family. If you choose the larger unit and your family size goes does, you will be moved into smaller units. However, PHA can’t deny a transfer for overcrowded households because this can provide a health and safety risk. 

Once you’re approved and have a unit, you’ll need to sign the lease. There’s additional paperwork since there’s now a third party involved. Over time you can expect people to come and do check-ins on your unit to make sure everything is up to the HUD’s standards.

WaitlistTypeStatus
Clarksburg-Harrison Regional Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Now
Charleston-Kanawha Housing AuthorityProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Charleston-Kanawha Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Fairmont-Morgantown Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Wheeling Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Huntington Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Homecrest ManorPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of the City of MartinsburgPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of the City of Mount HopePublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of the City of WilliamsonPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Fairmont-Morgantown Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of the City of KeyserPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of the City of MoundsvillePublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of the City of GraftonPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of the City of BuckhannonPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of Benwood And McMechenPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of the City of BeckleyPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of the City of WeirtonPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of the City of Point PleasantPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Bluefield Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of the City of ElkinsPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of the City of St. AlbansPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of the City of South CharlestonPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of the City of DunbarPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of the City of SpencerPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of the City of WestonPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of the City of PiedmontPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of the County of JacksonPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of Mingo CountyPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of Raleigh CountyPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of Boone CountyPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of the City of RomneyPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Homecrest ManorPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed

What is Public Housing?

Similar to section 8, Public Housing is another form of rental assistance through the government. These programs are put into place to help people who are considered low-income for the area. They also put a lot of lower-income students into better schools so they have access to more opportunities. 

The public housing program is also provided to seniors and people with disabilities. These groups of people made up 56% of public housing recipients in 2020. This program is funded by the Public Housing Capital Fund and the Public Housing Operation Fund which struggle to get funding to meet demand. As always funding is difficult to acquire for these programs and although they get some funding, a lot of these units are in need of renovations and no additional funding has been allocated for building/ buying new units since 1990. 

Who does public housing help?

Public housing helps so many people across the country. The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities conducted an analysis on the people who benefit from the public housing program. In 2018 they went through data from the department of housing of urban development and the result are presented below. 

It looks like public housing is used mostly by families of different ethnicities. Looking at this data, it’s nice to see that these programs are actually supporting the youth with 37% of people living in a public housing household are under 18. Public housing gives people access to education and job opportunities outside of their current demographic and makes financial mobility more accessible. 

How do I apply for Public Housing? 

Similar to section 8, there are thousands of Housing Administration offices that work to manage these programs. These offices areas in large cities, full cities, or multiple jurisdictions in the area. The application has to be in written format and there’s no online process. Either you or your local HUD office will fill it out prior to filing. 

There are certain things you’re HUD agent will need in order to assist in completing your application. This includes information about all adults and children residing in the unit, your current contact information, your living circumstances and veteran status, previous landlords for references, information and proof of income, and information on how they can verify the income level. An inspector can also come to your current residence to see the current state of your home and conduct some interviews in the household. More advanced public housing authority offices have self-serve kiosks where you can apply. Aside from that, they can accept applications via email, telephone, and mail. Here are some things you should expect from your applications: 

  • Name and social security number of head of household
  • Date and time of application or application number
  • Household Type
  • Number of family members
  • Amount and source of annual income
  • Admission preference, if any
  • Accessibility requirement, if any
  • Race and ethnicity of the family head

Who qualifies for Public Housing?

There are three main qualification factors to know if you qualify for section 8 housing. These include your income level compared to your area, your disability, elderly or familial status, and your citizenship/immigration status. As you know, income limits change from city to city so you may be eligible in one jurisdiction but not eligible in another. 

There are also some disqualifying factors to consider before applying for public housing. Drug-related crimes are one of the quickest ways to get disqualified from housing assistance. However, if you do have a criminal record, I would reach out to your local housing authority office to see their policy. It is possible to win an appeal based on rehabilitation and mitigation. 

How many Public Housing waitlists are open in West Virginia?

There are 33 public housing waitlists open in the state of West Virginia. On this page you’ll see all the current open waitlists and when they were updated. To apply to a waitlist, you’ll have to reach out to your local housing authority office. You can view our income limits tool to see your income limit for different counties. 

Similar to section 8, each jurisdiction establishes and administers its own program while maintaining federal guidelines. If you’d like to apply for multiple jurisdictions, you should contact each local office. 

Can I apply to a waitlist for a different county?

The public housing authority will only accept applications for open waitlists. However, you can apply for any jurisdiction you’d like and your local agent will narrow it down to the units you’re qualified for. It’s against the law for Public Housing Authorities to set minimum resident limits for housing assistance. 

Managing paperwork for so many different applications could get confusing and messy. It’s important that you keep track of all your communications and paperwork. If someone from the PHA repeatedly tries to reach out and has trouble getting in touch with you, you will be removed from the list.

Are my chances better if I apply as soon as it opens?

The Public Housing Authority does allocate preferences for people in certain situations. These preferences come in two forms, the location of the unit and the rankings to get placed in a unit. Before they can set these preferences in place, they need to first figure out which households match which units so they can start the smaller lists.

 It’s not one giant list or a lottery system. Since the lists are smaller, someone with fewer preferences may still get a unit before a priority household because it might not be a fit for other families. Here are some preferences to consider: 

  • Extremely low income (less than 40% of families in the local area)
  • Need to remain in a certain jurisdiction for work or school 
  • Elderly, Displaced or disabled 
  • Victims of Domestic Violence
  • Natural Disaster displacement 

What happens after I get approved?

Someone from your local PHA will reach out to you and let you know there’s a unit available for you. Since there can be multiple units available per waitlist, your agent will discuss the different sizes available to you. If you choose a smaller unit, you cannot request an adjustment unless there’s a change to the number of members in your family. If you choose the larger unit and your family size goes does, you will be moved into smaller units. However, PHA can’t deny a transfer for overcrowded households because this can provide a health and safety risk. 

Once you’re approved and have a unit, you’ll need to sign the lease. There’s additional paperwork since there’s now a third party involved. Over time you can expect people to come and do check-ins on your unit to make sure everything is up to the HUD’s standards.

WaitlistTypeStatus
Seattle Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Peninsula Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Bakerview Apartments,Project-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Kittitas County Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Anacortes Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Kennewick Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of Grant CountyPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Island County Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority City of OthelloPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
HA City of Sedro WoolleyPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
HA City of SunnysidePublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
HA City of Walla WallaPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Camas RidgeProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Isabella Court I and IIProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Mill CreekProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Vista CourtSenior Project-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Skyline Crest ApartmentsProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Meriwether PlaceProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
The Meadows 2 and 3-BedroomProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Rhododendron Place Studio UnitsProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Bremerton Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Pineview Apartments, Wiggums Park Place Apartments, and Broadway Plaza
Apartments,
Project-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
Douglas Grove Apartments,Project-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
Renton Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
RADProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
Kelso Homes and Kalama HomesPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Cowlitz VillaSenior and Disabled Public Housing Waiting ListClosed
Housing Authority of the City of Pasco and Franklin CountyPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
City of Bellingham, 3-4 BedroomPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Whatcom County 4-BedroomPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
City of BellinghamProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
Whatcom County,Project-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
City of Bellingham, 2-Bedroom,Public Housing Waiting ListClosed
Varsity Village,Project-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
Deer Run TerraceSenior Project-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
River HouseSenior Project-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
Whatcom County 3-BedroomPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
City of Bellingham, Studio and 1-Bedroom,Senior and Disabled Public Housing Waiting ListClosed
1-BedroomPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Krislen Apartments, Homes First Scattered-Site Units, and Evergreen Vista
Apartments;
Project-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
Pierce County Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Spokane Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Pope Francis Haven ApartmentsProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
Clare View Seniors Apartments Near Elderly andDisabled Project-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
The Meadows 1-BedroomProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed

What is Public Housing?

Similar to section 8, Public Housing is another form of rental assistance through the government. These programs are put into place to help people who are considered low-income for the area. They also put a lot of lower-income students into better schools so they have access to more opportunities. 

The public housing program is also provided to seniors and people with disabilities. These groups of people made up 56% of public housing recipients in 2020. This program is funded by the Public Housing Capital Fund and the Public Housing Operation Fund which struggle to get funding to meet demand. As always funding is difficult to acquire for these programs and although they get some funding, a lot of these units are in need of renovations and no additional funding has been allocated for building/ buying new units since 1990. 

Who does public housing help?

Public housing helps so many people across the country. The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities conducted an analysis on the people who benefit from the public housing program. In 2018 they went through data from the department of housing of urban development and the result are presented below. 

It looks like public housing is used mostly by families of different ethnicities. Looking at this data, it’s nice to see that these programs are actually supporting the youth with 37% of people living in a public housing household are under 18. Public housing gives people access to education and job opportunities outside of their current demographic and makes financial mobility more accessible. 

How do I apply for Public Housing? 

Similar to section 8, there are thousands of Housing Administration offices that work to manage these programs. These offices areas in large cities, full cities, or multiple jurisdictions in the area. The application has to be in written format and there’s no online process. Either you or your local HUD office will fill it out prior to filing. 

There are certain things you’re HUD agent will need in order to assist in completing your application. This includes information about all adults and children residing in the unit, your current contact information, your living circumstances and veteran status, previous landlords for references, information and proof of income, and information on how they can verify the income level. An inspector can also come to your current residence to see the current state of your home and conduct some interviews in the household. More advanced public housing authority offices have self-serve kiosks where you can apply. Aside from that, they can accept applications via email, telephone, and mail. Here are some things you should expect from your applications: 

  • Name and social security number of head of household
  • Date and time of application or application number
  • Household Type
  • Number of family members
  • Amount and source of annual income
  • Admission preference, if any
  • Accessibility requirement, if any
  • Race and ethnicity of the family head

Who qualifies for Public Housing?

There are three main qualification factors to know if you qualify for section 8 housing. These include your income level compared to your area, your disability, elderly or familial status, and your citizenship/immigration status. As you know, income limits change from city to city so you may be eligible in one jurisdiction but not eligible in another. 

There are also some disqualifying factors to consider before applying for public housing. Drug-related crimes are one of the quickest ways to get disqualified from housing assistance. However, if you do have a criminal record, I would reach out to your local housing authority office to see their policy. It is possible to win an appeal based on rehabilitation and mitigation. 

How many Public Housing waitlists are open in Washington?

There are 45 public housing waitlists open in the state of Washington. On this page you’ll see all the current open waitlists and when they were updated. To apply to a waitlist, you’ll have to reach out to your local housing authority office. You can view our income limits tool to see your income limit for different counties. 

Similar to section 8, each jurisdiction establishes and administers its own program while maintaining federal guidelines. If you’d like to apply for multiple jurisdictions, you should contact each local office. 

Can I apply to a waitlist for a different county?

The public housing authority will only accept applications for open waitlists. However, you can apply for any jurisdiction you’d like and your local agent will narrow it down to the units you’re qualified for. It’s against the law for Public Housing Authorities to set minimum resident limits for housing assistance. 

Managing paperwork for so many different applications could get confusing and messy. It’s important that you keep track of all your communications and paperwork. If someone from the PHA repeatedly tries to reach out and has trouble getting in touch with you, you will be removed from the list.

Are my chances better if I apply as soon as it opens?

The Public Housing Authority does allocate preferences for people in certain situations. These preferences come in two forms, the location of the unit and the rankings to get placed in a unit. Before they can set these preferences in place, they need to first figure out which households match which units so they can start the smaller lists.

 It’s not one giant list or a lottery system. Since the lists are smaller, someone with fewer preferences may still get a unit before a priority household because it might not be a fit for other families. Here are some preferences to consider: 

  • Extremely low income (less than 40% of families in the local area)
  • Need to remain in a certain jurisdiction for work or school 
  • Elderly, Displaced or disabled 
  • Victims of Domestic Violence
  • Natural Disaster displacement 

What happens after I get approved?

Someone from your local PHA will reach out to you and let you know there’s a unit available for you. Since there can be multiple units available per waitlist, your agent will discuss the different sizes available to you. If you choose a smaller unit, you cannot request an adjustment unless there’s a change to the number of members in your family. If you choose the larger unit and your family size goes does, you will be moved into smaller units. However, PHA can’t deny a transfer for overcrowded households because this can provide a health and safety risk. 

Once you’re approved and have a unit, you’ll need to sign the lease. There’s additional paperwork since there’s now a third party involved. Over time you can expect people to come and do check-ins on your unit to make sure everything is up to the HUD’s standards.

WaitlistTypeStatus
Bristol Redevelopment and Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Hopewell Redevelopment and Housing AuthorityProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Norfolk Redevelopment and Housing AuthoritySenior and Disabled Public Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
FamilyPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
New Clay House II and Cary WestProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
FamilyPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Multi-PropertyProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Armstrong Rennaissance 1BSenior Project-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Single Room Occupancy (SRO)Senior Project-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
The Alexander at 1090 ApartmentsProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Homeless Permanent Supportive HousingProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Lynchburg Redevelopment and Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Norton Redevelopment and Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Charlottesville Redevelopment and Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Crescent HallsSenior and Disabled Public Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Hampton Redevelopment and Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Wytheville Redev. and Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Waynesboro Redevelopment and Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Staunton Redevelopment and Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Wise County Redevelopment and Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Cumberland Plateau Regional Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Marion Redevelopment and Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Scott County Redevelopment and Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Lee County Redevelopment and Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Swanson Homes, 2 and 4-BedroomPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Hamilton Place I and Hamilton Place IIProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
Various CommunitiesPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
2-BedroomProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
Hopewell Redevelopment and Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
3-BedroomProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
North Wellington Townhomes, RADProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
Homeless Single Room OccupancyProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
Grandy Village Revitalization Limited Low-Income Housing Tax Credit –Project-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
Retreat at Harbor Point Low-Income Housing Tax Credit –Project-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
Church Street Station LimitedProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
Cottage Bridge and St. Paul Apartments LimitedProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
Grandy Village Revitalization LimitedProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
Ashton Apartment Homes Tax Credit |Project-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
Market Heights Apartments LimitedProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
Multiple PropertiesProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
Blackwell Senior CottageSenior Public Housing Waiting ListClosed
Cardinal Village, Cedar Terrace, Ingram Heights, and Pleasant ViewPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Morningside ManorSenior and Disabled Public Housing Waiting ListClosed
Melrose Towers ApartmentsPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Indian Rock Village and Jamestown PlacePublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Scattered SitesPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Chesapeake Redevelopment and Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Franklin Heights 1-5 BedroomProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
Franklin Redevelopment And Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Suffolk Redevelopment and Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Williamsburg Redevelopment and Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Abingdon Redevelopment And Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Alexandria Redevelopment and Housing AuthoritySenior and Disabled Public Housing Waiting ListClosed
Alexandria Redevelopment and Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Rental Assistance DemonstrationProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed

What is Public Housing?

Similar to section 8, Public Housing is another form of rental assistance through the government. These programs are put into place to help people who are considered low-income for the area. They also put a lot of lower-income students into better schools so they have access to more opportunities. 

The public housing program is also provided to seniors and people with disabilities. These groups of people made up 56% of public housing recipients in 2020. This program is funded by the Public Housing Capital Fund and the Public Housing Operation Fund which struggle to get funding to meet demand. As always funding is difficult to acquire for these programs and although they get some funding, a lot of these units are in need of renovations and no additional funding has been allocated for building/ buying new units since 1990. 

Who does public housing help?

Public housing helps so many people across the country. The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities conducted an analysis on the people who benefit from the public housing program. In 2018 they went through data from the department of housing of urban development and the result are presented below. 

It looks like public housing is used mostly by families of different ethnicities. Looking at this data, it’s nice to see that these programs are actually supporting the youth with 37% of people living in a public housing household are under 18. Public housing gives people access to education and job opportunities outside of their current demographic and makes financial mobility more accessible. 

How do I apply for Public Housing? 

Similar to section 8, there are thousands of Housing Administration offices that work to manage these programs. These offices areas in large cities, full cities, or multiple jurisdictions in the area. The application has to be in written format and there’s no online process. Either you or your local HUD office will fill it out prior to filing. 

There are certain things you’re HUD agent will need in order to assist in completing your application. This includes information about all adults and children residing in the unit, your current contact information, your living circumstances and veteran status, previous landlords for references, information and proof of income, and information on how they can verify the income level. An inspector can also come to your current residence to see the current state of your home and conduct some interviews in the household. More advanced public housing authority offices have self-serve kiosks where you can apply. Aside from that, they can accept applications via email, telephone, and mail. Here are some things you should expect from your applications: 

  • Name and social security number of head of household
  • Date and time of application or application number
  • Household Type
  • Number of family members
  • Amount and source of annual income
  • Admission preference, if any
  • Accessibility requirement, if any
  • Race and ethnicity of the family head

Who qualifies for Public Housing?

There are three main qualification factors to know if you qualify for section 8 housing. These include your income level compared to your area, your disability, elderly or familial status, and your citizenship/immigration status. As you know, income limits change from city to city so you may be eligible in one jurisdiction but not eligible in another. 

There are also some disqualifying factors to consider before applying for public housing. Drug-related crimes are one of the quickest ways to get disqualified from housing assistance. However, if you do have a criminal record, I would reach out to your local housing authority office to see their policy. It is possible to win an appeal based on rehabilitation and mitigation. 

How many Public Housing waitlists are open in Virginia?

There are 56 public housing waitlists open in the state of Virginia. On this page you’ll see all the current open waitlists and when they were updated. To apply to a waitlist, you’ll have to reach out to your local housing authority office. You can view our income limits tool to see your income limit for different counties. 

Similar to section 8, each jurisdiction establishes and administers its own program while maintaining federal guidelines. If you’d like to apply for multiple jurisdictions, you should contact each local office. 

Can I apply to a waitlist for a different county?

The public housing authority will only accept applications for open waitlists. However, you can apply for any jurisdiction you’d like and your local agent will narrow it down to the units you’re qualified for. It’s against the law for Public Housing Authorities to set minimum resident limits for housing assistance. 

Managing paperwork for so many different applications could get confusing and messy. It’s important that you keep track of all your communications and paperwork. If someone from the PHA repeatedly tries to reach out and has trouble getting in touch with you, you will be removed from the list.

Are my chances better if I apply as soon as it opens?

The Public Housing Authority does allocate preferences for people in certain situations. These preferences come in two forms, the location of the unit and the rankings to get placed in a unit. Before they can set these preferences in place, they need to first figure out which households match which units so they can start the smaller lists.

 It’s not one giant list or a lottery system. Since the lists are smaller, someone with fewer preferences may still get a unit before a priority household because it might not be a fit for other families. Here are some preferences to consider: 

  • Extremely low income (less than 40% of families in the local area)
  • Need to remain in a certain jurisdiction for work or school 
  • Elderly, Displaced or disabled 
  • Victims of Domestic Violence
  • Natural Disaster displacement 

What happens after I get approved?

Someone from your local PHA will reach out to you and let you know there’s a unit available for you. Since there can be multiple units available per waitlist, your agent will discuss the different sizes available to you. If you choose a smaller unit, you cannot request an adjustment unless there’s a change to the number of members in your family. If you choose the larger unit and your family size goes does, you will be moved into smaller units. However, PHA can’t deny a transfer for overcrowded households because this can provide a health and safety risk. 

Once you’re approved and have a unit, you’ll need to sign the lease. There’s additional paperwork since there’s now a third party involved. Over time you can expect people to come and do check-ins on your unit to make sure everything is up to the HUD’s standards.

WaitlistTypeStatus
Burlington Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Snow BlockProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Anne Wilder RichardsProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Red Clover CommonsProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Upper Story ApartmentsProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Brattleboro Housing PartnershipsProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Rutland Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Springfield Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Barre Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Winooski Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Montpelier Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Bennington Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Vermont State Housing AuthorityProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice

What is Public Housing?

Similar to section 8, Public Housing is another form of rental assistance through the government. These programs are put into place to help people who are considered low-income for the area. They also put a lot of lower-income students into better schools so they have access to more opportunities. 

The public housing program is also provided to seniors and people with disabilities. These groups of people made up 56% of public housing recipients in 2020. This program is funded by the Public Housing Capital Fund and the Public Housing Operation Fund which struggle to get funding to meet demand. As always funding is difficult to acquire for these programs and although they get some funding, a lot of these units are in need of renovations and no additional funding has been allocated for building/ buying new units since 1990. 

Who does public housing help?

Public housing helps so many people across the country. The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities conducted an analysis on the people who benefit from the public housing program. In 2018 they went through data from the department of housing of urban development and the result are presented below. 

It looks like public housing is used mostly by families of different ethnicities. Looking at this data, it’s nice to see that these programs are actually supporting the youth with 37% of people living in a public housing household are under 18. Public housing gives people access to education and job opportunities outside of their current demographic and makes financial mobility more accessible. 

How do I apply for Public Housing? 

Similar to section 8, there are thousands of Housing Administration offices that work to manage these programs. These offices areas in large cities, full cities, or multiple jurisdictions in the area. The application has to be in written format and there’s no online process. Either you or your local HUD office will fill it out prior to filing. 

There are certain things you’re HUD agent will need in order to assist in completing your application. This includes information about all adults and children residing in the unit, your current contact information, your living circumstances and veteran status, previous landlords for references, information and proof of income, and information on how they can verify the income level. An inspector can also come to your current residence to see the current state of your home and conduct some interviews in the household. More advanced public housing authority offices have self-serve kiosks where you can apply. Aside from that, they can accept applications via email, telephone, and mail. Here are some things you should expect from your applications: 

  • Name and social security number of head of household
  • Date and time of application or application number
  • Household Type
  • Number of family members
  • Amount and source of annual income
  • Admission preference, if any
  • Accessibility requirement, if any
  • Race and ethnicity of the family head

Who qualifies for Public Housing?

There are three main qualification factors to know if you qualify for section 8 housing. These include your income level compared to your area, your disability, elderly or familial status, and your citizenship/immigration status. As you know, income limits change from city to city so you may be eligible in one jurisdiction but not eligible in another. 

There are also some disqualifying factors to consider before applying for public housing. Drug-related crimes are one of the quickest ways to get disqualified from housing assistance. However, if you do have a criminal record, I would reach out to your local housing authority office to see their policy. It is possible to win an appeal based on rehabilitation and mitigation. 

How many Public Housing waitlists are open in Vermont?

There are 13 public housing waitlists open in the state of Vermont. On this page you’ll see all the current open waitlists and when they were updated. To apply to a waitlist, you’ll have to reach out to your local housing authority office. You can view our income limits tool to see your income limit for different counties. 

Similar to section 8, each jurisdiction establishes and administers its own program while maintaining federal guidelines. If you’d like to apply for multiple jurisdictions, you should contact each local office. 

Can I apply to a waitlist for a different county?

The public housing authority will only accept applications for open waitlists. However, you can apply for any jurisdiction you’d like and your local agent will narrow it down to the units you’re qualified for. It’s against the law for Public Housing Authorities to set minimum resident limits for housing assistance. 

Managing paperwork for so many different applications could get confusing and messy. It’s important that you keep track of all your communications and paperwork. If someone from the PHA repeatedly tries to reach out and has trouble getting in touch with you, you will be removed from the list.

Are my chances better if I apply as soon as it opens?

The Public Housing Authority does allocate preferences for people in certain situations. These preferences come in two forms, the location of the unit and the rankings to get placed in a unit. Before they can set these preferences in place, they need to first figure out which households match which units so they can start the smaller lists.

 It’s not one giant list or a lottery system. Since the lists are smaller, someone with fewer preferences may still get a unit before a priority household because it might not be a fit for other families. Here are some preferences to consider: 

  • Extremely low income (less than 40% of families in the local area)
  • Need to remain in a certain jurisdiction for work or school 
  • Elderly, Displaced or disabled 
  • Victims of Domestic Violence
  • Natural Disaster displacement 

What happens after I get approved?

Someone from your local PHA will reach out to you and let you know there’s a unit available for you. Since there can be multiple units available per waitlist, your agent will discuss the different sizes available to you. If you choose a smaller unit, you cannot request an adjustment unless there’s a change to the number of members in your family. If you choose the larger unit and your family size goes does, you will be moved into smaller units. However, PHA can’t deny a transfer for overcrowded households because this can provide a health and safety risk. 

Once you’re approved and have a unit, you’ll need to sign the lease. There’s additional paperwork since there’s now a third party involved. Over time you can expect people to come and do check-ins on your unit to make sure everything is up to the HUD’s standards.

WaitlistTypeStatus
Ogden Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
2, 3 and 4-BedroomPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Valley Fair VillagePublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Hunter Hollow RADProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Life Start VillageProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Westlake, Rental Assistance Demonstration Program (RAD)Project-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Hill Ave and 500 EastProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Cyprus Park, Academy Park and Kearns Mountain View, Rental Assistance
Demonstration Program (RAD)
Project-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Beaver Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Provo City Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Davis Community Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of Utah CountyPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Emery County Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of Carbon CountyPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Tooele County Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
St. George Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
County High RisePublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
County High RisePublic Housing Waiting ListClosed

What is Public Housing?

Similar to section 8, Public Housing is another form of rental assistance through the government. These programs are put into place to help people who are considered low-income for the area. They also put a lot of lower-income students into better schools so they have access to more opportunities. 

The public housing program is also provided to seniors and people with disabilities. These groups of people made up 56% of public housing recipients in 2020. This program is funded by the Public Housing Capital Fund and the Public Housing Operation Fund which struggle to get funding to meet demand. As always funding is difficult to acquire for these programs and although they get some funding, a lot of these units are in need of renovations and no additional funding has been allocated for building/ buying new units since 1990. 

Who does public housing help?

Public housing helps so many people across the country. The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities conducted an analysis on the people who benefit from the public housing program. In 2018 they went through data from the department of housing of urban development and the result are presented below. 

It looks like public housing is used mostly by families of different ethnicities. Looking at this data, it’s nice to see that these programs are actually supporting the youth with 37% of people living in a public housing household are under 18. Public housing gives people access to education and job opportunities outside of their current demographic and makes financial mobility more accessible. 

How do I apply for Public Housing? 

Similar to section 8, there are thousands of Housing Administration offices that work to manage these programs. These offices areas in large cities, full cities, or multiple jurisdictions in the area. The application has to be in written format and there’s no online process. Either you or your local HUD office will fill it out prior to filing. 

There are certain things you’re HUD agent will need in order to assist in completing your application. This includes information about all adults and children residing in the unit, your current contact information, your living circumstances and veteran status, previous landlords for references, information and proof of income, and information on how they can verify the income level. An inspector can also come to your current residence to see the current state of your home and conduct some interviews in the household. More advanced public housing authority offices have self-serve kiosks where you can apply. Aside from that, they can accept applications via email, telephone, and mail. Here are some things you should expect from your applications: 

  • Name and social security number of head of household
  • Date and time of application or application number
  • Household Type
  • Number of family members
  • Amount and source of annual income
  • Admission preference, if any
  • Accessibility requirement, if any
  • Race and ethnicity of the family head

Who qualifies for Public Housing?

There are three main qualification factors to know if you qualify for section 8 housing. These include your income level compared to your area, your disability, elderly or familial status, and your citizenship/immigration status. As you know, income limits change from city to city so you may be eligible in one jurisdiction but not eligible in another. 

There are also some disqualifying factors to consider before applying for public housing. Drug-related crimes are one of the quickest ways to get disqualified from housing assistance. However, if you do have a criminal record, I would reach out to your local housing authority office to see their policy. It is possible to win an appeal based on rehabilitation and mitigation. 

How many Public Housing waitlists are open in Utah?

There are 18 public housing waitlists open in the state of Utah. On this page you’ll see all the current open waitlists and when they were updated. To apply to a waitlist, you’ll have to reach out to your local housing authority office. You can view our income limits tool to see your income limit for different counties. 

Similar to section 8, each jurisdiction establishes and administers its own program while maintaining federal guidelines. If you’d like to apply for multiple jurisdictions, you should contact each local office. 

Can I apply to a waitlist for a different county?

The public housing authority will only accept applications for open waitlists. However, you can apply for any jurisdiction you’d like and your local agent will narrow it down to the units you’re qualified for. It’s against the law for Public Housing Authorities to set minimum resident limits for housing assistance. 

Managing paperwork for so many different applications could get confusing and messy. It’s important that you keep track of all your communications and paperwork. If someone from the PHA repeatedly tries to reach out and has trouble getting in touch with you, you will be removed from the list.

Are my chances better if I apply as soon as it opens?

The Public Housing Authority does allocate preferences for people in certain situations. These preferences come in two forms, the location of the unit and the rankings to get placed in a unit. Before they can set these preferences in place, they need to first figure out which households match which units so they can start the smaller lists.

 It’s not one giant list or a lottery system. Since the lists are smaller, someone with fewer preferences may still get a unit before a priority household because it might not be a fit for other families. Here are some preferences to consider: 

  • Extremely low income (less than 40% of families in the local area)
  • Need to remain in a certain jurisdiction for work or school 
  • Elderly, Displaced or disabled 
  • Victims of Domestic Violence
  • Natural Disaster displacement 

What happens after I get approved?

Someone from your local PHA will reach out to you and let you know there’s a unit available for you. Since there can be multiple units available per waitlist, your agent will discuss the different sizes available to you. If you choose a smaller unit, you cannot request an adjustment unless there’s a change to the number of members in your family. If you choose the larger unit and your family size goes does, you will be moved into smaller units. However, PHA can’t deny a transfer for overcrowded households because this can provide a health and safety risk. 

Once you’re approved and have a unit, you’ll need to sign the lease. There’s additional paperwork since there’s now a third party involved. Over time you can expect people to come and do check-ins on your unit to make sure everything is up to the HUD’s standards.

WaitlistTypeStatus
Kyle Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListPostponed
Housing Authority of the City of El PasoPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of the City of El PasoProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Fort Worth Housing SolutionsPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Stallion Ridge Apartment HomesProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Dallas Housing AuthorityProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Other Bedroom SizesPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
3-BedroomPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of DenisonPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Corsicana Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of BorgerPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of OlneyPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of DublinPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Paris Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of HaskellPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Bowie County Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of SweetwaterPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
1-2 BedroomSenior and Disabled Public Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
1-3 Bedroom FamilyPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of DeleonPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of DeleonSenior and Disabled Public Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of AnsonPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of BrysonSenior and Disabled Public Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Haltom City Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of ComanchePublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of RobyPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of RotanPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of CrosbytonPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Floydada Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Aspermont Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of MabankPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Trinidad, TexasPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of EdgewoodPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Mount Pleasant Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of Royse CityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of RosebudPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Rogers Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of BartlettPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of SeagravesPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
2-BedroomPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of ThorndalePublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of the City of CrowellPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of WhitesboroPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of PecosPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of ColemanSenior Public Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Abilene Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Mart Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Tatum Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of RockdalePublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Poplar ApartmentsPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Oak Leaf Village ApartmentsSenior and Disabled Public Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
San Angelo Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Mt. PleasantProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of FruitvalePublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of AtlantaPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of BlossomPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Beaumont Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of the City of DaytonPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Crockett Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of TimpsonPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Centerville Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of KirbyvillePublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of GrapelandPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of HuntingtonPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of San AugustinePublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Housing Authority of City of NavasotaPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
3-Bedroom Sandy Oaks and ParkcrestProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
2-Bedroom Sandy OaksProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
1-Bedroom Sandy OaksSenior and Disabled Project-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
FamilyPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
San Antonio Housing AuthoritySenior and Disabled Public Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
504 Accessible HousingSenior and Disabled Public Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Wheatley ParkSenior Project-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Corpus Christi Housing AuthorityProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Luling Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
San Marcos Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Kingsville Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Runge Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Falfurrias Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Pleasanton Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Lockhart Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Georgetown Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Gregory Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Seguin Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Llano Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Uvalde Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Villa San Juanita and Villa SandovaPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Leon Gardens, Ebony Estates, Las Palmas, Casa Grande I and Casa Grande IIPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Goliad Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Mutli-PropertyProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
1-BedroomPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
2-BedroomPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
1-BedroomPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
2-BedroomPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Housing Authority of LubbockSenior Public Housing Waiting ListClosed
Commerce Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
McKinney Housing Authority – Public HousingPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Killeen Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Plano Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Bonham and Honey GroveProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
Housing Authority of the City of FriscoPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Housing Authority of DawsonPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
3-BedroomPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
0, and 1-BedroomPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Grapevine Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Grandview Housing AuthorityProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
Mesquite Housing DivisionProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
GeneralPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Baytown, TexasPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Galveston Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Galveston Housing AuthorityProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
Housing Authority of the City of OrangePublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Brenham Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Gardens at San Juan SquareProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
Housing Authority of the City of BrownsvillePublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Housing Authority of the City of BrownsvilleProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
Housing Authority of the City of LaredoProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
2 and 4-BedroomPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
McAllen Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Edinburg Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Near Elderly and DisabledProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
Pharr Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Mathis Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Villa SerenaPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Laurel PlazaPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Landa PlaceSenior Project-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
Schertz Housing AuthoritySenior and Disabled Public Housing Waiting ListClosed
Housing Authority of CelestePublic Housing Waiting ListUnknown
Housing Authority of OdessaPublic Housing Waiting ListUnknown

What is Public Housing?

Similar to section 8, Public Housing is another form of rental assistance through the government. These programs are put into place to help people who are considered low-income for the area. They also put a lot of lower-income students into better schools so they have access to more opportunities. 

The public housing program is also provided to seniors and people with disabilities. These groups of people made up 56% of public housing recipients in 2020. This program is funded by the Public Housing Capital Fund and the Public Housing Operation Fund which struggle to get funding to meet demand. As always funding is difficult to acquire for these programs and although they get some funding, a lot of these units are in need of renovations and no additional funding has been allocated for building/ buying new units since 1990. 

Who does public housing help?

Public housing helps so many people across the country. The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities conducted an analysis on the people who benefit from the public housing program. In 2018 they went through data from the department of housing of urban development and the result are presented below. 

It looks like public housing is used mostly by families of different ethnicities. Looking at this data, it’s nice to see that these programs are actually supporting the youth with 37% of people living in a public housing household are under 18. Public housing gives people access to education and job opportunities outside of their current demographic and makes financial mobility more accessible. 

How do I apply for Public Housing? 

Similar to section 8, there are thousands of Housing Administration offices that work to manage these programs. These offices areas in large cities, full cities, or multiple jurisdictions in the area. The application has to be in written format and there’s no online process. Either you or your local HUD office will fill it out prior to filing. 

There are certain things you’re HUD agent will need in order to assist in completing your application. This includes information about all adults and children residing in the unit, your current contact information, your living circumstances and veteran status, previous landlords for references, information and proof of income, and information on how they can verify the income level. An inspector can also come to your current residence to see the current state of your home and conduct some interviews in the household. More advanced public housing authority offices have self-serve kiosks where you can apply. Aside from that, they can accept applications via email, telephone, and mail. Here are some things you should expect from your applications: 

  • Name and social security number of head of household
  • Date and time of application or application number
  • Household Type
  • Number of family members
  • Amount and source of annual income
  • Admission preference, if any
  • Accessibility requirement, if any
  • Race and ethnicity of the family head

Who qualifies for Public Housing?

There are three main qualification factors to know if you qualify for section 8 housing. These include your income level compared to your area, your disability, elderly or familial status, and your citizenship/immigration status. As you know, income limits change from city to city so you may be eligible in one jurisdiction but not eligible in another. 

There are also some disqualifying factors to consider before applying for public housing. Drug-related crimes are one of the quickest ways to get disqualified from housing assistance. However, if you do have a criminal record, I would reach out to your local housing authority office to see their policy. It is possible to win an appeal based on rehabilitation and mitigation. 

How many Public Housing waitlists are open in Texas?

There are 129 public housing waitlists open in the state of Texas. On this page you’ll see all the current open waitlists and when they were updated. To apply to a waitlist, you’ll have to reach out to your local housing authority office. You can view our income limits tool to see your income limit for different counties. 

Similar to section 8, each jurisdiction establishes and administers its own program while maintaining federal guidelines. If you’d like to apply for multiple jurisdictions, you should contact each local office. 

Can I apply to a waitlist for a different county?

The public housing authority will only accept applications for open waitlists. However, you can apply for any jurisdiction you’d like and your local agent will narrow it down to the units you’re qualified for. It’s against the law for Public Housing Authorities to set minimum resident limits for housing assistance. 

Managing paperwork for so many different applications could get confusing and messy. It’s important that you keep track of all your communications and paperwork. If someone from the PHA repeatedly tries to reach out and has trouble getting in touch with you, you will be removed from the list.

Are my chances better if I apply as soon as it opens?

The Public Housing Authority does allocate preferences for people in certain situations. These preferences come in two forms, the location of the unit and the rankings to get placed in a unit. Before they can set these preferences in place, they need to first figure out which households match which units so they can start the smaller lists.

 It’s not one giant list or a lottery system. Since the lists are smaller, someone with fewer preferences may still get a unit before a priority household because it might not be a fit for other families. Here are some preferences to consider: 

  • Extremely low income (less than 40% of families in the local area)
  • Need to remain in a certain jurisdiction for work or school 
  • Elderly, Displaced or disabled 
  • Victims of Domestic Violence
  • Natural Disaster displacement 

What happens after I get approved?

Someone from your local PHA will reach out to you and let you know there’s a unit available for you. Since there can be multiple units available per waitlist, your agent will discuss the different sizes available to you. If you choose a smaller unit, you cannot request an adjustment unless there’s a change to the number of members in your family. If you choose the larger unit and your family size goes does, you will be moved into smaller units. However, PHA can’t deny a transfer for overcrowded households because this can provide a health and safety risk. 

Once you’re approved and have a unit, you’ll need to sign the lease. There’s additional paperwork since there’s now a third party involved. Over time you can expect people to come and do check-ins on your unit to make sure everything is up to the HUD’s standards.

WaitlistTypeStatus
Johnson City Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Pinecrest ApartmentsProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Lake Terrace ApartmentsProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Chattanooga Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
LaFollette Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Athens Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Sweetwater Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Rockwood Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Jefferson City Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Clinton Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Etowah Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Jellico Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Morristown Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
2 and 3-BedroomPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Rogersville Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Harriman Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Greeneville Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Newport Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Lenoir City Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Dayton Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Sevierville Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Loudon Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Maryville Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Efficiency, 2, 3, and 4-BedroomPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Elizabethton Housing and Development AgencyPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Oliver Springs Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Erwin Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Oak Ridge Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Grundy Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Allenton Heights and Lincoln Courts FamilyPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Allenton Heights Annex, Rosewood Gardens, and Centennial PassSenior Public Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
McMillan TowersSenior and Disabled Public Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Paris Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Union City Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Brownsville Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Dyersburg Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Trenton Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Humboldt Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Milan Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Lexington Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Covington Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Millington Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Savannah Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Bolivar Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Parsons-Decaturville Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Huntingdon Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Ripley Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Martin Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Newbern Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
McKenzie Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Gallaway Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Fayetteville Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Lebanon Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
2 and 3-BedroomPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Tullahoma Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Gallatin Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Waverly Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Lewisburg Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Cookeville Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Shelbyville Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Sparta Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Mt. Pleasant Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
McMinnville Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Livingston Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Smithville Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Hartsville Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Erin Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Lafayette Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Cromwell HillsProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
South Pittsburg Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Cleveland Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
1 and 5-BedroomPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Memphis Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Parkway Terrace Apartments, ContemporaryPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Buffalo Trail ApartmentsProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
CWA Plaza Apartments IProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
Sycamores TerraceSenior Project-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
Hillside FlatsProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
808 at SkylineProject-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
26th and Clarksville, and Robinson FlatsSenior Project-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
Trevecca Towers I & IISenior and Disabled Project-Based Voucher Waiting ListClosed
Clarksville Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Pulaski Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
1, 4, and 5 BedroomPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Franklin Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Franklin Housing AuthoritySenior and Disabled Public Housing Waiting ListClosed
Lawrenceburg Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListClosed
Franklin Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListUnknown

What is Public Housing?

Similar to section 8, Public Housing is another form of rental assistance through the government. These programs are put into place to help people who are considered low-income for the area. They also put a lot of lower-income students into better schools so they have access to more opportunities. 

The public housing program is also provided to seniors and people with disabilities. These groups of people made up 56% of public housing recipients in 2020. This program is funded by the Public Housing Capital Fund and the Public Housing Operation Fund which struggle to get funding to meet demand. As always funding is difficult to acquire for these programs and although they get some funding, a lot of these units are in need of renovations and no additional funding has been allocated for building/ buying new units since 1990. 

Who does public housing help?

Public housing helps so many people across the country. The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities conducted an analysis on the people who benefit from the public housing program. In 2018 they went through data from the department of housing of urban development and the result are presented below. 

It looks like public housing is used mostly by families of different ethnicities. Looking at this data, it’s nice to see that these programs are actually supporting the youth with 37% of people living in a public housing household are under 18. Public housing gives people access to education and job opportunities outside of their current demographic and makes financial mobility more accessible. 

How do I apply for Public Housing? 

Similar to section 8, there are thousands of Housing Administration offices that work to manage these programs. These offices areas in large cities, full cities, or multiple jurisdictions in the area. The application has to be in written format and there’s no online process. Either you or your local HUD office will fill it out prior to filing. 

There are certain things you’re HUD agent will need in order to assist in completing your application. This includes information about all adults and children residing in the unit, your current contact information, your living circumstances and veteran status, previous landlords for references, information and proof of income, and information on how they can verify the income level. An inspector can also come to your current residence to see the current state of your home and conduct some interviews in the household. More advanced public housing authority offices have self-serve kiosks where you can apply. Aside from that, they can accept applications via email, telephone, and mail. Here are some things you should expect from your applications: 

  • Name and social security number of head of household
  • Date and time of application or application number
  • Household Type
  • Number of family members
  • Amount and source of annual income
  • Admission preference, if any
  • Accessibility requirement, if any
  • Race and ethnicity of the family head

Who qualifies for Public Housing?

There are three main qualification factors to know if you qualify for section 8 housing. These include your income level compared to your area, your disability, elderly or familial status, and your citizenship/immigration status. As you know, income limits change from city to city so you may be eligible in one jurisdiction but not eligible in another. 

There are also some disqualifying factors to consider before applying for public housing. Drug-related crimes are one of the quickest ways to get disqualified from housing assistance. However, if you do have a criminal record, I would reach out to your local housing authority office to see their policy. It is possible to win an appeal based on rehabilitation and mitigation. 

How many Public Housing waitlists are open in Tennessee?

There are 88 public housing waitlists open in the state of Tennessee. On this page you’ll see all the current open waitlists and when they were updated. To apply to a waitlist, you’ll have to reach out to your local housing authority office. You can view our income limits tool to see your income limit for different counties. 

Similar to section 8, each jurisdiction establishes and administers its own program while maintaining federal guidelines. If you’d like to apply for multiple jurisdictions, you should contact each local office. 

Can I apply to a waitlist for a different county?

The public housing authority will only accept applications for open waitlists. However, you can apply for any jurisdiction you’d like and your local agent will narrow it down to the units you’re qualified for. It’s against the law for Public Housing Authorities to set minimum resident limits for housing assistance. 

Managing paperwork for so many different applications could get confusing and messy. It’s important that you keep track of all your communications and paperwork. If someone from the PHA repeatedly tries to reach out and has trouble getting in touch with you, you will be removed from the list.

Are my chances better if I apply as soon as it opens?

The Public Housing Authority does allocate preferences for people in certain situations. These preferences come in two forms, the location of the unit and the rankings to get placed in a unit. Before they can set these preferences in place, they need to first figure out which households match which units so they can start the smaller lists.

 It’s not one giant list or a lottery system. Since the lists are smaller, someone with fewer preferences may still get a unit before a priority household because it might not be a fit for other families. Here are some preferences to consider: 

  • Extremely low income (less than 40% of families in the local area)
  • Need to remain in a certain jurisdiction for work or school 
  • Elderly, Displaced or disabled 
  • Victims of Domestic Violence
  • Natural Disaster displacement 

What happens after I get approved?

Someone from your local PHA will reach out to you and let you know there’s a unit available for you. Since there can be multiple units available per waitlist, your agent will discuss the different sizes available to you. If you choose a smaller unit, you cannot request an adjustment unless there’s a change to the number of members in your family. If you choose the larger unit and your family size goes does, you will be moved into smaller units. However, PHA can’t deny a transfer for overcrowded households because this can provide a health and safety risk. 

Once you’re approved and have a unit, you’ll need to sign the lease. There’s additional paperwork since there’s now a third party involved. Over time you can expect people to come and do check-ins on your unit to make sure everything is up to the HUD’s standards.

WaitlistTypeStatus
Burke Housing And Redevelopment CommissionPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Kennebec Housing and Redevelopment CommissionPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
De Smet Housing and Redevelopment CommissionPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Lennox Housing and Redevelopment CommissionSenior and Disabled Public Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Lakeview TowerPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
City of Mitchell Housing and Redevolpment CommissionPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Sioux Falls Housing and Redevelopment CommissionPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Sisseton Housing and Redevelopment CommissionPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Lemmon Housing and Redevelopment CommissionPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Volga Housing And Redevelopment CommissionPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Aberdeen Housing AuthorityPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Pierre Housing and Redevelopment CommisionPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Miller Housing and Redevelopment CommisionPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Watertown Housing and Redevelopment CommissionPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Pennington County Housing and Redevelopment CommissionPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice
Meade County Housing and Redevelopment CommissionPublic Housing Waiting ListOpen Until Further Notice

What is Public Housing?

Similar to section 8, Public Housing is another form of rental assistance through the government. These programs are put into place to help people who are considered low-income for the area. They also put a lot of lower-income students into better schools so they have access to more opportunities. 

The public housing program is also provided to seniors and people with disabilities. These groups of people made up 56% of public housing recipients in 2020. This program is funded by the Public Housing Capital Fund and the Public Housing Operation Fund which struggle to get funding to meet demand. As always funding is difficult to acquire for these programs and although they get some funding, a lot of these units are in need of renovations and no additional funding has been allocated for building/ buying new units since 1990. 

Who does public housing help?

Public housing helps so many people across the country. The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities conducted an analysis on the people who benefit from the public housing program. In 2018 they went through data from the department of housing of urban development and the result are presented below. 

It looks like public housing is used mostly by families of different ethnicities. Looking at this data, it’s nice to see that these programs are actually supporting the youth with 37% of people living in a public housing household are under 18. Public housing gives people access to education and job opportunities outside of their current demographic and makes financial mobility more accessible. 

How do I apply for Public Housing? 

Similar to section 8, there are thousands of Housing Administration offices that work to manage these programs. These offices areas in large cities, full cities, or multiple jurisdictions in the area. The application has to be in written format and there’s no online process. Either you or your local HUD office will fill it out prior to filing. 

There are certain things you’re HUD agent will need in order to assist in completing your application. This includes information about all adults and children residing in the unit, your current contact information, your living circumstances and veteran status, previous landlords for references, information and proof of income, and information on how they can verify the income level. An inspector can also come to your current residence to see the current state of your home and conduct some interviews in the household. More advanced public housing authority offices have self-serve kiosks where you can apply. Aside from that, they can accept applications via email, telephone, and mail. Here are some things you should expect from your applications: 

  • Name and social security number of head of household
  • Date and time of application or application number
  • Household Type
  • Number of family members
  • Amount and source of annual income
  • Admission preference, if any
  • Accessibility requirement, if any
  • Race and ethnicity of the family head

Who qualifies for Public Housing?

There are three main qualification factors to know if you qualify for section 8 housing. These include your income level compared to your area, your disability, elderly or familial status, and your citizenship/immigration status. As you know, income limits change from city to city so you may be eligible in one jurisdiction but not eligible in another. 

There are also some disqualifying factors to consider before applying for public housing. Drug-related crimes are one of the quickest ways to get disqualified from housing assistance. However, if you do have a criminal record, I would reach out to your local housing authority office to see their policy. It is possible to win an appeal based on rehabilitation and mitigation. 

How many Public Housing waitlists are open in South Dakota?

There are 16 public housing waitlists open in the state of South Dakota. On this page you’ll see all the current open waitlists and when they were updated. To apply to a waitlist, you’ll have to reach out to your local housing authority office. You can view our income limits tool to see your income limit for different counties. 

Similar to section 8, each jurisdiction establishes and administers its own program while maintaining federal guidelines. If you’d like to apply for multiple jurisdictions, you should contact each local office. 

Can I apply to a waitlist for a different county?

The public housing authority will only accept applications for open waitlists. However, you can apply for any jurisdiction you’d like and your local agent will narrow it down to the units you’re qualified for. It’s against the law for Public Housing Authorities to set minimum resident limits for housing assistance. 

Managing paperwork for so many different applications could get confusing and messy. It’s important that you keep track of all your communications and paperwork. If someone from the PHA repeatedly tries to reach out and has trouble getting in touch with you, you will be removed from the list.

Are my chances better if I apply as soon as it opens?

The Public Housing Authority does allocate preferences for people in certain situations. These preferences come in two forms, the location of the unit and the rankings to get placed in a unit. Before they can set these preferences in place, they need to first figure out which households match which units so they can start the smaller lists.

 It’s not one giant list or a lottery system. Since the lists are smaller, someone with fewer preferences may still get a unit before a priority household because it might not be a fit for other families. Here are some preferences to consider: 

  • Extremely low income (less than 40% of families in the local area)
  • Need to remain in a certain jurisdiction for work or school 
  • Elderly, Displaced or disabled 
  • Victims of Domestic Violence
  • Natural Disaster displacement 

What happens after I get approved?

Someone from your local PHA will reach out to you and let you know there’s a unit available for you. Since there can be multiple units available per waitlist, your agent will discuss the different sizes available to you. If you choose a smaller unit, you cannot request an adjustment unless there’s a change to the number of members in your family. If you choose the larger unit and your family size goes does, you will be moved into smaller units. However, PHA can’t deny a transfer for overcrowded households because this can provide a health and safety risk. 

Once you’re approved and have a unit, you’ll need to sign the lease. There’s additional paperwork since there’s now a third party involved. Over time you can expect people to come and do check-ins on your unit to make sure everything is up to the HUD’s standards.